techno_logics

In the process of developing mycophone_genus we bumped into several historical references that inspired us.

MYCOPHONE_EMERGENCE: MUSIC BOX
Music box is a 19th/20th century automatic musical instrument that produces sounds by the use of a set of pins placed on a revolving cylinder or disc so as to pluck the tuned teeth or lamellae of a steel comb. They were developed from musical snuff boxes of the 18th century and called carillons à musique.

MYCOPHONE_EMERGENCE: ORAMICS
Oramics is a draw sound technique developed by Daphne Oram, a British composer, who worked at the legendary BBC Radiophonic workshop in the late 1950’s. Oram’s composition machine consisted of a large rectangular metal frame, providing a table-like surface traversed by ten synchronized strips of clear, sprocketed 35mm film. The musician drew shapes on the film to create a mask, which modulated the light received by photocells. Although the output from the machine was monophonic, the sounds could be added to multitrack tapes to provide more texture.

Links_
Oramics
Gallery of Oramics

MYCOPHONE_UNISON: AUTOMATON
An automaton is a self-operating machine or robot. The word “automaton” is the latinization of the Greek αὐτόματον, automaton, “acting of one’s own will”.

MYCOPHONE_UNISON: CELESTIAL CARTOGRAPHY
Celestial cartography, uranography or star cartography is the fringe of astronomy and branch of cartography concerned with mapping stars, galaxies, and other astronomical objects on the celestial sphere. Measuring the position and light of charted objects requires a variety of instruments and techniques. These techniques have developed from angle measurements with quadrants and the unaided eye, through sextants combined with lenses for light magnification, up to current methods which include computer automated space telescopes. Uranographers have historically produced planetary position tables, star tables and star maps for use by both amateur and professional astronomers.
Star chart or star map is a map of the night sky. Astronomers divide these into grids to use them more easily. They are used to identify and locate astronomical objects such as stars, constellations and galaxies. They have been used for human navigation since time immemorial.

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